Saturday, September 5, 2015

Queens of YA Literature: Annabeth Chase

Over the past decade, Western society has made enormous strides towards gender equality. However, we all know that the media and other aspects of our world occasionally fail to portray women in the best light. Video games, movies, and even books sometimes portray as weak-willed and second rate. 

Fortunately, many authors of the twenty-first century are conjuring up female characters worthy of discussion and admiration. I've decided to highlight some of these characters with this meme, Queens of Literature. Each post will focus on a fictional heroine from a book I have read who possesses the qualities of a truly incredible woman.


(Artistic rendering done by viria13, an amazing artist who loves Percy Jackson)
Witty and daring daughter of Athena, the goddess of wisdom
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Who is she? 
For starters, Rick Riordan's Annabeth is a demigod (part human, part Greek goddess). Her intelligence and knack for strategy come as gifts from her immortal mother, Athena. With Percy Jackson and a motley cast of lovable characters, Annabeth embarks on countless adventures to protect the world from the very real dangers of mythology. 

Description:  
Gray-eyed (a trait shared by all of Athena's children) and blonde.Slender, but strong and skilled with weapons.

Why is she a queen? 
First of all, I cannot express my undying love for Rick Riordan's characters. Seriously, that man is a wizard when it comes to creating hilarious and incredible characters. Annabeth is no exception. In her debut, Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief, Annabeth is twelve years old. Even then, she possesses admirable amounts of strength and will. As she ages throughout the rest of Riordan's books, her intelligence and confidence continue to blossom. She's the kind of girl you want to be, and the kind of girl you desperately don't want to be your enemy. 

A quote about Annabeth

“He had no idea where the stereotype of dumb giggly blondes came from. Ever since he'd met Annabeth at the Grand Canyon last winter,when she'd marched toward him with that Give me Percy Jackson or I’ll kill you expression, Leo had thought of blondes as much too smart and much too dangerous.” (The Mark of Athena